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Wellbeing Monthly: Which yoga is right for you?

Find out about different types of yoga then try one out with a free class

This month we hear from Wellbeing@Work partner, Studio X at Bankside Health Club on which yoga is right for you. 

From Ashtanga to Vinyasa, Studio X has got a great variety of Yoga classes on offer in our mind/body studio. But do you know which class will have you lying prone on the mat breathing deeply, imagining a soothing ocean washing over your body? Which class will have you performing a set series of backbends and warrior poses? And what on earth is a Chakra?!

Here is The Bankside Health Club’s guide to transform you from a newbie to a yogi.

Hatha Yoga

Hatha Yoga is widely acknowledged as a more classical, gentle style of yoga. Hatha is a style of yoga that dates back to 15th century India and is designed to create a greater balance between body and mind, and ultimately, to prepare the body and mind for subtle spiritual experiences of meditation. A Hatha yoga class will typically include yoga asanas, a series of yoga postures designed to improve health and remove muscle imbalances and Pranayama, traditional breathing exercises to bring greater peace to the mind and body. Derivatives of Classical Hatha Yoga include Ivebgar Yoga, Kripalu Yoga, Anusara Yoga and Bikram Yoga.

Ashtanga Yoga

Unlike other forms of yoga teaching, Ashtanga Yoga has a set sequence of increasingly difficult poses. Beginner yoga students start with the Primary Series and then progress through later series at their own pace. Despite performing the same poses each time, Ashtanga Yoga is one of the more demanding yoga practices. The Primary Series, Yoga Chikitsa literally means Yoga therapy and features 75 poses designed to develop the body by aligning the spine, purifying the blood and building strength, endurance and flexibility.

Throughout the practice, the relationship between body movement and breath is maintained. For each asana (pose), there is a corresponding breath, either inhaling or exhaling. The purpose of this movement and breathing synchronicity is to warm up the blood for better circulation and to increase oxygen flow within the blood. The results from regular Ashtanga Yoga practice range from better blood circulation, oxygen delivery and purifying the body of toxins through perspiration, which leaves the body pure, healthy, and strong.

Vinyasa Yoga

Vinyasa Yoga was originally inspired by Ashtanga Yoga but was redesigned in the mid '90s' to put a more Western face to yoga? Whilst Ashtanga Yoga traditionally views yoga as a spiritual practice for mind-body purification, in Vinyasa yoga, the emphasis is more on yoga as a form of exercise and a method to develop physical fitness. A practice will include a series of challenging poses, designed to give even the beginner yoga students a comprehensive workout to develop strength, flexibility, and physical grace. Whilst Power Yoga places a great degree of emphasis on cultivating physical fitness, like other forms of Yoga it also aims to establish mental clarity and harmonise the relationship between the body, mind, and spirit. Beginner yogis find that the disciplined, slow-yet-steady flow of poses in Power Yoga help focus the mind and establish a sense of inner, one-pointed strength.

Yoga it also aims to establish mental clarity and harmonise the relationship between the body, mind, and spirit. Beginner yogis find that the disciplined, slow-yet-steady flow of poses in Power Yoga help focus the mind and establish a sense of inner, one-pointed strength.

The Bankside Health Club is currently offering Better Bankside members the opportunity to experience a Studio X class completely free. Click here to download your pass.

*pass is only available if you haven’t used the Club before.

Created Jan 27 2014